Kellie Ulyate

I am a curious womxn.

I believe nature is a great healer, as is connection, movement, joy, creativity and pleasure.

Photographs of Kellie Ulyate, a tree and flowers
Images: Kellie Ulyate

I love to learn, engage and to share inspiration with people who want to grow their possibility and feel more enlivened in themselves, or their work.

I trained as a research scientist, with a PhD in molecular and evolutionary biology, then joined the pharmaceutical industry, working in many areas across the business for almost two decades.


After experiencing my own health challenges a few years ago, I started practicing mindfulness, meditation and yoga and gained a deeper appreciation for energy, emotions and authenticity. This led to a career change. Now I blend my background and personal passions, working holistically with individuals and businesses. I help people get out of their heads and into their hearts to discover new possibilities with creative conversations, yoga and business sessions, that use sensory stimulation, movement, metaphors and connection to nature.


What is easy for you as a womxn?

To tune into how other people are feeling and the dynamics in a situation.


What is difficult for you as a womxn?

To risk displeasing or offending other people, and breaking rules or expectations. It is inevitable and even healthy. I do it but it is difficult.


How do you maintain mental health?

Through movement, meditation, going outside and putting my feet in the grass and looking at the sky, connecting with other people and dancing to loud music.


What brings you joy?

Good food. I love to be cooked for. I love the natural, wholesome goodness of whole foods that have been lovingly prepared with delicious flavours. I make good friends with people who prepare food as I really, deeply appreciate their talent and contribution, they are literally creating with nature in a way that nourishes us. There are many other things, but good food comes to mind first!


How do you nurture your relationship with nature?

I love to walk each day with my dog in nature reserves in my area. I take time to look up to the sky, listen to birds and touch the trees. I hold park yoga sessions, so we sense the natural environment including the temperature, the texture and sounds around us, while literally saluting to the sun - it adds to the experience.


I take photos of nature to pause and appreciate the beauty of clouds, trees, leaves, flowers, bees….


Where do you live/work?

I live and work in Brisbane - in Turrbal and Jagera country - mostly from home and nearby. I call the culmination of what I do CREATE SPACE WITH KELLIE and work online as well as in person.


I have been doing yoga at Keralgerie Park, which is from the Aboriginal name meaning string of water holes – a place where people gather and meet. I think this is apt for our connection there.


Who is an influential womxn in your life and why?

My meditation coach, Alison Potts from Innate Being. I have been fortunate to have a lot of development through my corporate career but the personal sessions with Alison inspired a transformation that was far greater than any other program I participated in. The sessions created space for me to connect with myself at a deeper level, finding wisdom within rather than looking outside for answers or following someone else’s approach. I continue to be inspired by Alison as she lives and teaches with heart and integrity from experience and encourages people to embrace and care for their individuality and unique needs.

 

Connection

A deep listening to our heart voice allows a connection to the same inner wisdom that Kellie has found transformational. As we grow up we are trained to trust our head, over riding instincts about people and ethical situations. In looking back we wonder why we squashed down our misgivings, perhaps Kellie hits the nail on the head when she says it's difficult "to risk displeasing or offending other people, and breaking rules or expectations." This habit of being pleasing leads us away from wisdom.


Dadirri is a First Nation's practice of deep listening that creates space to reconnect to our hearts. Miriam-Rose Ungunmerr has generously shared the concept of dadirri with us and talks about poetically about the power we have within us, “We are like the tree standing in the middle of a bushfire sweeping through the timber. The leaves are scorched and the tough bark is scarred and burnt, but inside the tree, the sap is still flowing and under the ground, the roots are still strong. Like the tree, we have endured the flames and yet we still have the power to be reborn”.

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